The GCRC is pleased to honour the following trainees with our most recent awards.


You Chi (Emily) Tang

Award Recipient 
Canderel Studentship 2016

September 2016

My research project focuses on investigating the synonymous cellular behavior and mechanism both in embryonic development and tumor progression of cancer cells. Apoptosis, the programmed cell death, has been demonstrated its regulation importance as one of the key cellular events both in cancer propagation and organismal development. Read more

English

Valerie Vinette

September 2016  (RENEWAL)

Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in North America and the third most diagnosed cancer in Canada. Other than chronic intestinal inflammation, which is a known risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), it has recently been established that CRC patients also have an altered metabolism.

 

English

Tung Bui

September 2016

Despite the significant clinical benefit of therapies in recent years, breast cancer continues to the leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Using mouse models of breast cancer, we aim to understand the molecular and genetic causes of the disease.

The main goal of my project is to elucidate the roles of 2 classes of cell adhesion proteins (beta-Catenin and integrins) during tumour progression, metastasis, and recurrence.

English

Tina Gruosso

September 2016  

Based on 2010 estimates from the Canadian Cancer Society, about 1 in 9 Canadian women is expected to develop breast cancer during her lifetime and 1 in 30 will die from it. Triple Negative Breast Cancers (TNBC) represent 15-20% of all diagnosed breast cancers and show poor prognosis. A huge improvement is possible concerning this area of research and will directly impact a large number of patients.
 

English

Tim Kong

September 2016

As a recently graduated immunologist, I have been trained in understanding how individual surface proteins on immune cells can control the magnitude and quality of the immune response. The immune response is diverse and fascinating: in the presence of infectious agents, the immune cells proliferate and mount an attack, while in other events such as pregnancy or graft transplantation, there is a complete paradigm shift with the immune system becoming tolerant.

English

Richa Sharma

September 2016

Understanding how genes regulate embryogenesis is vital to development and cancer. Pax protein family is involved in regulating organ development as well as in cancer progression. Pax2/8 genes are found to regulate renal specification and morphogenesis in space and time. They act on key developmental processes such as cell commitment, mesenchymal-epithelial transition and epithelial tissue elongation.

English

Owen Chen

September 2016

Ovarian cancer is a disease frequently known as the “silent killer”. This is due to the fact that in the majority of cases, there are no symptoms associated with the disease until it has progressed to advanced stages, at which point the prediction of the outcome is very poor.

This project aims to understand a mechanism by which ovarian cancer may gain the ability to spread throughout the body.

English

Ouafa Najyb

September 2016  

Breast cancer, according to the Canadian Cancer Society, is one of the leading cause of death from cancer for Canadian women. Thus it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms to improve prevention and existing treatments of breast cancer for the well being of our future generations. In the last decades, cancer research has increasingly emphasized on the importance of cellular bioenergetics in uncontrolled cell proliferation, irrespective of subtypes and drugs that target tumour metabolism and that are being explored as anti-cancer agents.

English

Mireille Dessureault

September 2016

Cancer is still the leading cause of death among Canadians, with metastatic cancers accounting for over 90% of those deaths. The liver is a common site of metastasis, with breast and colorectal cancers (CRC) being two of the most common that spread to this organ.

Breast and CRC patients with unresectable hepatic metastases have a 5-year survival rate of respectively 5.5–8.5% and less than 2%. Therefore, there is a pressing need to identify novel regulators of liver metastases.

English

Lin Li

September 2016  

Epigenetic dysregulation is important in leukemia development. How this occurs through genome-wide chromatin reorganization and modifications remains largely unclear.

Our lab has been focused on two paralogous histone acetyltransferases called MOZ and MORF. Their genes have recently been identified as two high-ranking targets amplified in different types of cancer.

English

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